The Curse of the Broken Tailbone: A 2016 New Year’s Resolution

More than 22 years ago after my first child was born, I visited a Kristin and Elsie June 1993chiropractor, thinking the whole labor and delivery thing had done something wonky to my back. The doctor took a few X-rays, reviewed them, and then had this to say:

“Did you know you that broke your coccyx and that it healed at a 90 degree angle?”

No, I did not know this, though I could well remember a certain painful fall while I was playing soccer that was likely responsible for this invisible disfigurement. Oh well, it’s not like I could travel back in time and put my tailbone in a cast. Best to move forward.

“Also, do you know that you have scoliosis?” he added. No, I did not know this, either. He assured me that it wasn’t a serious case, but he cheerfully predicted that it would get worse as I got older. He also promised that if I returned to see him for regular adjustments, he could do exactly nothing to help me with either of these two conditions, and so, I took him at his word, and since the baby kept me pretty busy anyway, I did not return.

Now, as 2015 winds down, I am trying to get a head start on my 2016 New Year’s resolutions, and I think maybe one of them should be about my back. After all these years, there’s nothing really wrong with it that putting the seat back while I’m driving can’t fix, but as the saying goes, “Nothin’ ain’t wrong, but somethin’ ain’t right.”

Before I knew I had scoliosis and an oddly shaped tailbone, I was very flexible and could do things like handstands and backbends. Then, after having more babies and working long hours to support them, I discovered the benefits of sitting down and resting for long periods of time. While this has improved my quality of life immeasurably, it has done nothing for my poor, sad, little back.

So this year, I plan to sit (slightly) less often and move around and bend (just a little bit) more often, not so much as to diminish the magical quality of life I’ve achieved through persistent, excessive resting, but enough to keep me from looking and feeling like Quasimodo.

Please wish me luck with my New Year’s Resolution, and I wish you the very best for success with yours.

B blue rocking chairs
I know that I should move around and exercise more. It’s just that I so love to sit.
A place to sit
Sitting is lovelier, more restful, and let’s face it, much, much easier than not sitting. In fact, I highly recommend it.
B break room
You can’t blame me, can you?
BLOG GT blue vignette I want it
Oh, it’s a tough path I’ve chosen, indeed, to move more and sit less in 2016.
BLOG GT Japanese maple at Alyce Pedder's
You will sit by me and offer encouragement, won’t you? Oh wait, no . . .

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

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Author: kristinrusso

Writer, teacher, insatiable reader

8 thoughts on “The Curse of the Broken Tailbone: A 2016 New Year’s Resolution”

  1. You’re a great story teller, and decorator of back yards. Your sitting places look so inviting.
    You must take after your dad, I think he once got an award in sitting. He also broke his tail bone, playing football.
    I will volunteer to sit next to you at a movie next week.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to you, Laurie! I can’t wait to see you to share writerly trials and tribulations. And, you know, we can walk if you really want to. That’s fine. Walking, sitting, same thing really. We don’t have to decide right now. Just give sitting some thought, that’s all. You might like it. (Something tells me I’m not going to do so well with this New Year’s resolution of mine.) 🙂

      Like

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